60 minute rolls

60 Minute Rolls

November 12, 2014Danita

60 minute rolls

My in-laws arrived a few weeks ago for another nice long visit.  They came to house-sit and take care of our dogs while we were on vacation and will be staying until after Thanksgiving.  

It’s been great to have them here!  Grandpa is helping out with homeschooling and yard work.  Thanks to Grandma the laundry has actually been caught up…at least once or twice.  She’s also helping out with the meals, which is wonderful!  She cooks, I take pictures.  And the best part….new recipes like today’s 60 Minute Rolls.  I’ve known her for over twenty years and this is the first time I’ve had these rolls!  How is it that grandma’s do that? Just when you think you’ve had all their good food, they surprise you with something new!

The name “60 Minute Rolls” may sound time-consuming but homemade yeast rolls usually take much longer than these.  So when you think about having fresh, hot, homemade yeast rolls on the table for a weeknight dinner in about 60 Minutes, start to finish…it’s totally worth it!

I almost forgot, my kids said they taste like “Sister Shubert’s”, a frozen roll we enjoy very much.  

Here’s the Recipe:

  •  3 1/2 – 4 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (White Lily)
  • 3 Tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 pkg. dry yeast (about 4 1/2 tsp)
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/4 cup margarine
  • Extra margarine for brushing on rolls60 minute rolls

In a large bowl combine 1 1/2 cups flour, sugar, salt and yeast

60 minute rolls

In a small sauce pan over low heat, combine milk, water, and margarine until very warm but not boiling (120-130° F)

60 minute rolls

Gradually add the warm liquid to the dry ingredients and beat with electric mixer on medium speed for 2 minutes, scraping sides occasionally

60 minute rolls

“Batter” will be very thin

Add 1/2 cup flour and beat on additional 2 minutes on high speed

60 minute rolls

 Using 1/2 cup at a time, stir in enough additional flour to form a soft dough – 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 cups more

*Adding only 1/2 cup at a time helps prevent too much flour from being added.  More will be incorporated in kneading

**Several factors can affect the amount of flour your dough will need.  Depending on the temperature and humidity the amount you add could vary each time you make them.  Don’t worry, they will still be good.

60 minute rolls

Turn dough on to lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic

60 minute rolls

Butter all sides and bottom of a “Tupperware” type bowl with a lid that seals tightly

Place dough in bowl and turn so that all sides are coated with butter

60 minute rolls

Cover bowl tightly and place in a sink of warm water

Water should come about halfway up the side of the bowl

Allow to sit for 15 minutes

While dough is rising, pre-heat oven to 450 degrees, prepare baking pan by spraying with nonstick cooking spray and melt some extra margarine

60 minute rolls

Turn out onto flour board and flatten to about 1/2 inch thick

Using biscuit cutter or glass, cut dough into rounds about 3″ across

60 minute rolls

Brush each round with butter 

60 minute rolls

Fold in half so that the butter is on the inside.  Don’t seal or smash

Brush top with more butter

60 minute rolls

Cover with a cloth and let rise about 15 minutes

Bake at 450 degrees 12-15 minutes

60 minute rolls

 What’s you’re favorite kind of roll?

60 Minute Rolls
Homemade yeast rolls in about an hour!
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Ingredients
  1. 3 1/2 - 4 1/2 cups all purpose flour
  2. 3 Tbsp sugar
  3. 1 tsp salt
  4. 2 pkg. dry yeast (about 4 1/2 tsp)
  5. 1 cup milk
  6. 1/2 cup water
  7. 1/4 cup margarine
  8. Extra margarine for brushing on rolls
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl combine 1 1/2 cups flour, sugar, salt and yeast
  2. In a small sauce pan over low heat, combine milk, water, and margarine until very warm but not boiling (120-130° F)
  3. Gradually add the warm liquid to the dry ingredients and beat with electric mixer on medium speed for 2 minutes, scraping sides occasionally
  4. "Batter" will be very thin
  5. Add 1/2 cup flour and beat on additional 2 minutes on high speed
  6. Using 1/2 cup at a time, stir in enough additional flour to form a soft dough - 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 cups more.
  7. Turn dough on to lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic
  8. Butter all sides and bottom of a "Tupperware" type bowl with a lid that seals tightly
  9. Place dough in bowl and turn so that all sides are coated with butter
  10. Cover bowl tightly and place in a sink of warm water
  11. Water should come about halfway up the side of the bowl
  12. Allow to sit for 15 minutes
  13. While dough is rising, preheat oven to 450 degrees, prepare baking pan by spraying with nonstick cooking spray and melt some extra margarine
  14. Turn out onto flour board and flatten to about 1/2 inch thick
  15. Using biscuit cutter or glass, cut dough into rounds about 3" across
  16. Brush each round with butter
  17. Fold in half so that the butter is on the inside. Don't seal or smash
  18. Brush top with more butter
  19. Cover with a cloth and let rise about 15 minutes
  20. Bake at 450 degrees 12-15 minutes
Notes
  1. The number of rolls you get per batch will also vary slightly depending on how much flour you need to use.
  2. *Adding only 1/2 cup at a time helps prevent too much flour from being added. More will be incorporated in kneading
  3. **Several factors can affect the amount of flour your dough will need. Depending on the temperature and humidity the amount you add could vary each time you make them. Don't worry, they will still be good.
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3 Comments

  • Kathleen

    November 14, 2014 at 1:00 PM

    Those look so so so good and easy! Let me know next time you are making them and I’ll come over! 🙂

    1. Danita

      November 15, 2014 at 7:34 PM

      Come on over…we can whip them up together! Thanks for stopping by.

  • RaShell

    November 12, 2014 at 7:34 AM

    Those look and sound awesome!!

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